Office Hours & Location

Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous

Next Meeting: 5:00 pm Bridge to Recovery Group -

Welcome to the Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous!




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Area Office Hours






Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

CLOSED

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00 - 6:00pm

Friday

3:00 - 5:00pm

Saturday

10:00am -1:00pm

Sunday

CLOSED








If you are interested in getting involved with our area office, please visit our Area Office Serice Page

Contact Us

Need to contact us or planning on making a visit? Just click the button below to send us a note or get directions to our location.

1313 East Broad Street,
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: 614.252.1700

Get In Touch

We'd Love to hear from you. Maybe send us some feedback on the site, ask a question, or just say hello.

NA Central Ohio,

Thank you

Meetings on Thursday, September 18


5:00 pm Bridge to Recovery Group

3750 Sullivant Ave, Columbus

6:00 pm The Steps Light The Way Group
Travelers' Rest Baptist Church
1533 Cleveland Ave, Columbus

6:30 pm Grandview Early Birds Group
First Community Church Annex
1320 Cambridge Blvd., Grandview

7:00 pm Urbancrest/Grove City NA Group
The Union Baptist Church
3452 1st Ave, Urbancrest


see more

Public Service Announcement




Legal Drugs
Unmanageablity
Progression

Area Office Hours



Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

CLOSED

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00 - 6:00pm

Friday

3:00 - 5:00pm

Saturday

10:00am -1:00pm

Sunday

CLOSED



Please visit our Area Office Page for a map or click the "Office Hours & Location" link at the top of the page.

Newsletter



Self Sponsorship



During my recovery, I’ve periodically lapsed into sponsoring myself. If I were the only addict who had ever done this, it would be humiliating, but not worthy of writing an article for The NA Way. However, it seems this resistance to allowing others to help us is common among addicts. So, if you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, then maybe you, too, have some experience with self-sponsorship:

1. When you were new, did you resist getting a sponsor, because you didn’t want anyone telling you what to do?

2. Was your first sponsor a “temporary” sponsor, because you feared making long-term commitments?

3. Have you asked someone to sponsor you, and then not called for days, weeks, or months because you didn’t know what to say?

4. Do you not call your sponsor because he or she appears to be busy or tired?

5. Have you changed sponsors three or more times because you didn’t like their feedback?

6. Do you avoid calling because you don’t want to hear what your sponsor will say?

7. Do you ever feel grateful that you got your sponsor’s answering machine?

8. Have you lied to your sponsor?

9. Have you taken service positions without talking to your sponsor first, and then felt overwhelmed by the demands of the positions? Did you ever quit a service position without talking to your sponsor first?

10. Have you ever really needed to talk to your sponsor, but when you called, 
[Read More]

Just For Today

September 18, 2014

Honest relationships

Page 272

"One of the most profound changes in our lives is in the realm of personal relationships."

Basic Text, p.57

Recovery gives many of us relationships that are closer and more intimate than any we've had before. As time passes, we find ourselves gravitating toward those who eventually become our friends, our sponsor, and our partners in life. Shared laughter, tears, and struggles bring shared respect and lasting empathy.

What, then, do we do when we find that we don't agree with our friends on everything? We may discover that we don't share the same taste in music as our dearest friend, or that we don't agree with our spouse about how the furniture should be arranged, or even find ourselves voting differently than our sponsor at a service committee meeting. Does conflict mean that the friendship, the marriage, or the sponsorship is over? No!

These types of conflict are not only to be expected in any long-lasting relationship but are actually an indication that both people are emotionally healthy and honest individuals. In any relationship where both people agree on absolutely everything, chances are that only one person is doing the thinking. If we sacrifice our honesty and integrity to avoid conflicts or disagreements, we give away the best of what we bring to our relationships. We experience the full measure of partnership with another human being when we are fully honest.

Just for Today: I will welcome the differences that make each one of us special. Today, I will work on being myself.

Copyright (c) 2014,  NA World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Did You Know?

NA was simultaneously started in California and New York? New York had more focus on autonomy of groups, while the California version had a more unified approach which eventually succeeded.

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