Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous

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Welcome to the Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous!




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Area Office Hours






Monday

4-6PM

Tuesday

CLOSED

Wednesday

4-6 PM

Thursday

3-6PM

Friday

11AM - 1PM

Saturday

10AM - 1PM

Sunday

CLOSED








If you are interested in getting involved with our area office, please visit our Area Office Serice Page

Contact Us

Need to contact us or planning on making a visit? Just click the button below to send us a note or get directions to our location.

1313 East Broad Street,
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: 614.252.1700

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Meetings on Sunday, March 26


There are no more meetings today.
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Public Service Announcement




Legal Drugs
Unmanageablity
Progression

Area Office Hours


Monday 4-6PM
Tuesday CLOSED
Wednesday 4-6 PM
Thursday 3-6PM
Friday 11AM - 1PM
Saturday 10AM - 1PM
Sunday CLOSED


Please visit our Area Office Page for a map or click the "Office Hours & Location" link at the top of the page.

Newsletter



Welcome to the Cleanzine



Welcome to the Winter Issue of the CLEANZINE, our area newsletter. The primary purpose of our newsletter is to carry the message of hope and recovery to all sick and suffering addicts.


The theme of this issue is “identify not compare.” I went to a speaker meeting last week. One thing I found particularly insightful was the speaker's suggestion to focus on the similarities between addicts, not the differences. Differences are easy to spot. Age, race, sexual identity, drug of choice, and length of addiction are all things that can separate us from our program, if I choose to compare. Instead, if I choose to identify with the stories and experience of addicts around me, I can strengthen my recovery.


In this winter issue of the Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous Cleanzine we are examining the similarities that bring us together in recovery. Two addicts recount their stories and how they used the program to recover. Another piece examines and reflects on steps six through nine, offering insight and experience. Additionally, we have a beautiful poem written by one of our area's members. And finally, we've included the December Area Service Committee chairperson's report.

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[Read More]

Just For Today

March 26, 2017

Trusting a sponsor - worth the risk

Page 88

"In seeking a sponsor, most members look for someone they feel they can learn to trust, someone who seems compassionate ..."

IP No. 11, Sponsorship, Revised

The idea of sponsorship may be new to us. We have spent many years without direction, relying only on self-interest, suspecting everyone, trusting no one. Now that were learning to live in recovery, we find we need help. We can't do it alone anymore; we must take the risk of trusting another human being. Often, the first person we take that risk with is our sponsor-someone we respect, someone we identify with, someone we have reason to trust.

As we open up to our sponsor, a bond develops between us. We disclose our secrets and develop confidence in our sponsor's discretion. We share our concerns and learn to value our sponsor's experience. We share our pain and are met with empathy. We get to know one another, respect one another, love one another The more we trust our sponsor, the more we learn to trust ourselves.

Trust helps us move away from a life of fear, confusion, suspicion, and indirection. In the beginning, it feels risky to trust another addict. But that trust is the same principle we apply in our relationship with a Higher Power-risky or not, our experience tells us we can't do without it. And the more we take the risk of trusting our sponsor, the more open we will feel about our lives.

Just for Today: I want to grow and change. I will risk trusting my sponsor and find the rewards of sharing.

Copyright (c) 2007-2016,  NA World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Did You Know?

NA was simultaneously started in California and New York? New York had more focus on autonomy of groups, while the California version had a more unified approach which eventually succeeded.