Office Hours & Location

Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous

Next Meeting: 7:00 pm Write On Group - Columbus Public Health Department

Welcome to the Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous!




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Area Office Hours






Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

2:00-4:30pm

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00-6:00pm

Friday

CLOSED LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Saturday

CLOSED LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Sunday

CLOSED








If you are interested in getting involved with our area office, please visit our Area Office Serice Page

Contact Us

Need to contact us or planning on making a visit? Just click the button below to send us a note or get directions to our location.

1313 East Broad Street,
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: 614.252.1700

Get In Touch

We'd Love to hear from you. Maybe send us some feedback on the site, ask a question, or just say hello.

NA Central Ohio,

Thank you

Meetings on Monday, September 1


7:00 pm Write On Group
Columbus Public Health Department
240 Parsons Avenue, Room 119C, Columbus

7:30 pm Wecovery Meeting Group
St. Mary's Coptic Orthodox Church
200 Old Village Rd, Columbus

7:30 pm London Looney Tunes Group
1st Methodist Church
52 N. Main St., London

8:00 pm I Qualify Group
RPR Building
118 Stover Dr, Delaware


see more

Public Service Announcement




Legal Drugs
Unmanageablity
Progression

Area Office Hours



Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

2:00-4:30pm

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00-6:00pm

Friday

CLOSED LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Saturday

CLOSED LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Sunday

CLOSED



Please visit our Area Office Page for a map or click the "Office Hours & Location" link at the top of the page.

Newsletter



Self Sponsorship



During my recovery, I’ve periodically lapsed into sponsoring myself. If I were the only addict who had ever done this, it would be humiliating, but not worthy of writing an article for The NA Way. However, it seems this resistance to allowing others to help us is common among addicts. So, if you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, then maybe you, too, have some experience with self-sponsorship:

1. When you were new, did you resist getting a sponsor, because you didn’t want anyone telling you what to do?

2. Was your first sponsor a “temporary” sponsor, because you feared making long-term commitments?

3. Have you asked someone to sponsor you, and then not called for days, weeks, or months because you didn’t know what to say?

4. Do you not call your sponsor because he or she appears to be busy or tired?

5. Have you changed sponsors three or more times because you didn’t like their feedback?

6. Do you avoid calling because you don’t want to hear what your sponsor will say?

7. Do you ever feel grateful that you got your sponsor’s answering machine?

8. Have you lied to your sponsor?

9. Have you taken service positions without talking to your sponsor first, and then felt overwhelmed by the demands of the positions? Did you ever quit a service position without talking to your sponsor first?

10. Have you ever really needed to talk to your sponsor, but when you called, 
[Read More]

Just For Today

September 01, 2014

Real values

Page 255

"We become able to make wise and loving decisions based on principles and ideals that have real value in our lives."

Basic Text, p.105

Addiction gave us a certain set of values, principles we applied in our lives. "You pushed me" one of those values told us, "so I pushed back, hard." "It's mine" was another value generated by our disease. "Well, okay, maybe it wasn't mine to start with, but I liked it, so I made it mine." Those values were hardly values at all-more like rationalizations-and they certainly didn't help us make wise and loving decisions. In fact, they served primarily to dig us deeper and deeper into the grave we'd already dug for ourselves.

The Twelve Steps give us a strong dose of real values, the kind that help us live in harmony with ourselves and those around us. We place our faith not in ourselves, our families, or our communities, but in a Higher Power-and in doing so, we grow secure enough to be able to trust our communities, our families, and even ourselves. We learn to be honest, no matter what-and we learn to refrain from doing things we might want to hide. We learn to accept responsibility for our actions. "It's mine" is replaced with a spirit of selflessness. These are the kind of values that help us become a responsible, productive part of the life around us. Rather than digging us deeper into a grave, these values restore us to the world of the living.

Just for Today: I am grateful for the values I've developed. I am thankful for the ability they give me to make wise, loving decisions as a responsible, productive member of my community.

Copyright (c) 2013,  NA World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Did You Know?

NA was simultaneously started in California and New York? New York had more focus on autonomy of groups, while the California version had a more unified approach which eventually succeeded.

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