Office Hours & Location

Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous

Next Meeting: 7:30 pm 11th Step Candlelight Group - Boulevard Presbyterian Church

Welcome to the Central Ohio Area of Narcotics Anonymous!




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Area Office Hours






Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

2:00-4:30pm

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00-6:00pm

Friday

3:00-5:00pm

Saturday

10AM-1PM

Sunday

CLOSED








If you are interested in getting involved with our area office, please visit our Area Office Serice Page

Contact Us

Need to contact us or planning on making a visit? Just click the button below to send us a note or get directions to our location.

1313 East Broad Street,
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: 614.252.1700

Get In Touch

We'd Love to hear from you. Maybe send us some feedback on the site, ask a question, or just say hello.

NA Central Ohio,

Thank you

Meetings on Wednesday, August 20


7:30 pm 11th Step Candlelight Group
Boulevard Presbyterian Church
1235 Northwest Blvd., Grandview

7:30 pm New Wings Group of NA

729 S Walnut St, Marysville

7:45 pm Hope on McNaughten
NE corner of McNaughten and Baskerville between East Main St and East Broad St
588 Baskerville Rd, Reynoldsburg

8:00 pm Text Discussion Group
Linden Lutheran Church
1230 Oakland Park, Columbus


see more

Public Service Announcement




Legal Drugs
Unmanageablity
Progression

Area Office Hours



Monday

CLOSED

Tuesday

2:00-4:30pm

Wednesday

CLOSED

Thursday

3:00-6:00pm

Friday

3:00-5:00pm

Saturday

10AM-1PM

Sunday

CLOSED



Please visit our Area Office Page for a map or click the "Office Hours & Location" link at the top of the page.

Newsletter



Self Sponsorship



During my recovery, I’ve periodically lapsed into sponsoring myself. If I were the only addict who had ever done this, it would be humiliating, but not worthy of writing an article for The NA Way. However, it seems this resistance to allowing others to help us is common among addicts. So, if you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, then maybe you, too, have some experience with self-sponsorship:

1. When you were new, did you resist getting a sponsor, because you didn’t want anyone telling you what to do?

2. Was your first sponsor a “temporary” sponsor, because you feared making long-term commitments?

3. Have you asked someone to sponsor you, and then not called for days, weeks, or months because you didn’t know what to say?

4. Do you not call your sponsor because he or she appears to be busy or tired?

5. Have you changed sponsors three or more times because you didn’t like their feedback?

6. Do you avoid calling because you don’t want to hear what your sponsor will say?

7. Do you ever feel grateful that you got your sponsor’s answering machine?

8. Have you lied to your sponsor?

9. Have you taken service positions without talking to your sponsor first, and then felt overwhelmed by the demands of the positions? Did you ever quit a service position without talking to your sponsor first?

10. Have you ever really needed to talk to your sponsor, but when you called, 
[Read More]

Just For Today

August 20, 2014

Facing death

Page 242

"Often we have to face some type of crisis during our recovery, such as the death of a loved one..."

Basic Text, p. 102

Every life has a beginning and an end. However, when someone we love a great deal reaches the end of their life, we may have a very hard time accepting their sudden, final absence. Our grief may be so powerful that we fear it will completely overwhelm us - but it will not. Our sorrow may hurt more than anything we can remember, but it will pass.

We need not run from the emotions that may arise from the death of a loved one. Death and grieving are parts of the fullness of living "life on life's terms." By allowing ourselves the freedom to experience these feelings, we partake more deeply of both our recovery and our human nature.

Sometimes the reality of another's death makes our own mortality that much more pronounced. We reevaluate our priorities, appreciating the loved ones still with us all the more. Our life, and our life with them, will not go on forever. We want to make the most of what's most important while it lasts.

We might find that the death of someone we love helps strengthen our conscious contact with our Higher Power. If we remember that we can always turn to that source of strength when we are troubled, we will be able to stay focused on it no matter what may be going on around us.

Just for Today: I will accept the loss of one I love and turn to my Higher Power for the strength to accept my feelings. I will make the most of my love for those in my life today.

Copyright (c) 2013,  NA World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Did You Know?

NA was simultaneously started in California and New York? New York had more focus on autonomy of groups, while the California version had a more unified approach which eventually succeeded.

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